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Explore : Bruny Island

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Every journey to Bruny Island (pronounced brew-nee) starts on the ferry. Our ticket to and from the island cost us $33, which includes a lovely 2×15 minute ride across the D’entrecastreaux Channel. Our journey would take us from the ferry terminal south through the Neck to the southernmost pub in Australia and onwards to Cape Bruny.

 

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FAST FACTS

  • Bruny Island is actually two land masses that are joined by a sandy isthmus, which is known as the Neck.
  • The whole island is 100km long.
  • Adventure Bay was named after the ship that was captained by English navigator Tobias Furneaux, who landed at the island in 1773.
  • The island is named after French explorer Bruni d’Entrecasteaux, who sailed the channel and discovered that it was in fact an island in 1792. It was known as Bruni Island until 1918 when the spelling was changed to Bruny.

 

When we got down south, radio and reception was starting to fail. At one point, all we got was some church radio station. We listened for a little while and chuckled about the breastplate of righteousness that guards your heart against the evils of the world.

 

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The Neck

The Neck is the sandy isthmus that connects the north and south parts of Bruny Island. There’s a lookout there, Truganini Lookout, and it’s one of the best lookouts we’ve visited on our entire trip around Australia.

 

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Once you ascend the umpteen timber steps to the top, you are gifted with a 360 degree view of the ocean and the narrow strip of sand that connects the north and south ends of the island.

 

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Get Shucked

By far the best oysters in Tasmania and comparable to those in Coffin Bay SA, Get Shucked sells pre-shucked boogers of sea-salty delight that slide down your gob with lubricated ease. Give them a bit of punch with a sprinkle of Tobasco sauce.

 

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The outlet has a great sitting area and they’re licensed so you can enjoy a glass of Seven Sheds beer while you slurp down some oysters.

 

Bruny Island Cheese Co.

This artisan cheese producer is owned by Nick Haddow, who has been making cheeses around the world for over 10 years. He’s recognised as the finest artisan cheese producer in Australia and is also currently the only cheese maker in Australia that is allowed to use raw milk to make cheese. However, laws have changed recently so there may be more raw cheeses in the future.

 

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Our tasting session included four cheeses.

  • The Tom – a hard rind cheese that has a complicated and mature taste with a curious dimension of flavour.
  • The Saint – a soft white mould cheese that had a lovely delicate flavour of mould with plenty of buttery cheesiness.
  • The 1792 – a soft washed rind cheese with some pungency but a lovely soft cheese with plenty of salty goodness.
  • The o.d.o – a marinated cheese that is only one day old and is a combination of a feta and a mozzarella. It has a strong lactic acid flavour but would be awesome on some bread with a bit of smoked salmon.

 

Outside, there’s a fantastic deck space and picnic benches scattered in the surrounding gardens, perfect for stopping for a coffee, cider or cheese platter.

 

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Adventure Bay

 

Before stopping at Hotel Bruny for a beer, we detoured to Adventure Bay to see what was the big deal. Adventure Bay is on the eastern side of the Neck and was named after the ship of English navigator Tobias Furneaux’s in 1773.

 

While it’s mainly a holiday destination with heaps of options for accommodation, we did stop at one of the beautiful beaches and marvelled at the dark coloured sand.

 

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Hotel Bruny

Australia’s southernmost pub is located across the road from Sunset Bay. Needless to say, the view from out the front is fantastic, the distant mountains reflecting on the water. It’s a small pub with a standard pub menu that is reasonably priced for the location (a chicken parma is $26).

 

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We stopped in for a drink – Juz enjoyed a yeasty and crisp Cascade Draught while Dave opted for a dark Cascade Stout.

 

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Cloudy Bay

Located at the southern end of Bruny Island, Cloudy Bay is a great place for a quiet getaway. There’s a 5km long sheltered beach that offers great surfing, and you can drive along the sand to get to the Cloudy Bay campsite on the eastern end.

 

This is where we camped the night and enjoyed the company of the friendly wallabies.

 

 

 

Cape Bruny

The lighthouse atop Cape Bruny is quite significant. It is the second oldest lighthouse in Australia – first lit in March 1838 and decommissioned on 6 August 1996. It was replaced by a nearby solar powered light.

 

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Grandvewe Cheesery and Hartshorn Distillery

No, Grandvewe is not located on Bruny Island, but both are attractions of the Huon Trail, and it’s only 10 minutes south of the Kettering Ferry terminal.

 

Grandvewe is Tassie’s only sheep milk cheesery and is the only place on earth where you’ll find Sheep Whey Vodka and Vanilla Whey liqueur. You’ll notice a lot of sheepy things, like wool in the garden beds and some cute sheep grazing in the paddock near the car park.

 

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Make sure you taste all the cheeses because they’re fantastic. We particularly liked the smooth and yeasty Brebichon and the Sapphire Blue, a mild blue cheese similar to Rochefort, so we bought a piece of each.

 

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There were wines and spirits available for tasting as well. The Sheep Whey Vodka had an interesting apple and pear flavour. We enquired how they make alcohol from a by-product that is predominantly protein. It seems that finding the right yeast was an important factor, and of the residual lactose in the whey, the glucose that is separated from the galactose is what is turned into alcohol.

 

We also tried the Vanilla Whey Liqueur, which was deliciously sweet, smooth and tasted like custard, as well as their lychee-driven Chardonnay and dry but fruity Pinot Noir.

 

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$100 front

$100 Day : Brisbane

$100 Day
Since leaving Melbourne, Brisbane is the biggest city we have visited.  It’s Australia’s third most populous city, behind Melbourne and Sydney.  Planning our $100 day was hard because we wanted to fit in as much as possible, but we soon found that it would be harder to spend the $100 than we thought because of all the great things to do and see for free.

 

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1. Coffee at Scout Café, a short walk from the Brisbane City YHA.  It was a great way to start the day as this understated little café was playing happy big band music and made an awesome cup of coffee.

$8.80

2. Walk over William Jolly Bridge to Southbank – checked out the brachiosaurus display to promote a new exhibition, walked under the Arch of Flowers past Streets Beach to the CityHopper terminal.

Free

3. Catch the CityHopper and travel along the Brisbane River, past the Kangaroo Point Cliffs to Eagle Street Pier.

Free

4. Stroll through the city, down Queen Street Mall, admire City Hall in King George Square, visit Anzac Square War Memorial and St John’s Cathedral.

Free

5. Walk to Fortitude Valley for lunch – Fatboy’s Burgers lunch special at the Royal George Hotel.  A juicy BLT with lots of bacon and a side of curly fries with garlic aioli dip – absolutely delicious.

$13.70

6. Visit Chinatown and grab a pack of mochi from the Asian supermarket.

$2.80

7. Catch free city loop bus from Wharf Street to the Botanic Gardens and enjoy the mochi by the river.

Free

8. Cross over the Brisbane River via the Goodwill Bridge and have a peak at the HMAS Diamantina in the Maritime Museum.

Free

9. Get a tasting paddle of Brisbane Brewing Company beer at the Brewhouse.

$15.00

10. Sample some craft beer at the Hoo Ha Bar.  We got a pint of the Sunshine Coast Brewery Rye ESB.

$10.00

11. Munch on some dumplings at Bamboo Basket on Grey Street.

$19.80

12. Visit the Queensland Museum and learn about the natural world.

Free

13. Get a tasting paddle of James Squires beer at Charming Squires.

$12.00

13. Peruse the stalls at the Collective Markets.  We got a block of jam donut fudge from the Fudge Forever stall – amazingly good.

$5.00

TOTAL SPEND

$87.10

 

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Our night could have ended there… but it didn’t.  We went back to the Brisbane City YHA to find that they were doing trivia upstairs for a special event.  There were no teams – you just have to clap to buzz in and a correct answer scored you a beer.  After quickly winning three beers, we decided we had an unfair advantage with all the Australiana questions and kept quiet until the quizmaster coaxed Dave onto stage to take over.

 

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Once all the beer had run out, we had a quick rest before heading over the Caxton Street.  Our destination was Lefty’s Old Time Music Hall, an old American style venue with chandeliers, red draping on the ceilings and a small stage for live music.  If the brooding red bar isn’t your scene, go upstairs to the Mermaid Bar, with turquoise walls, fish net hanging from the ceiling, and an awesome model of a pirate ship behind the bar.  Lefty’s was so packed because it was a Friday night, and  it was about to turn into a sardine tin with sports fans leaving the Suncorp Stadium and creating a line out the front.  We fled, but promised that we’d be back on a weeknight for one of their infamous apple whiskeys.

 

All in all, it was a ripper $100 day.  We accomplished so much, saw everything we wanted to see, and even had some money left over.

 

Sunset over our campsite

Camping : Narrung

After conquering the Coonawarra Wine Region, we awoke early the next day and drove two hours from a rest area just north of Kingston SE to Narrung Jetty Reserve, a free camping area by the ferry that ushers cars over the water between Lake Alexandrina and Lake Albert.

 

We arrived just before midday and set up camp.  There were toilets, a tap that produced non-drinkable water, a sheltered picnic bench and fireplaces scattered around the area. We also had neighbours – a pair of grey nomads that had been travelling around the country for the last 18 months and still had another 18 months to go.  They had the complete set up – caravan with griller and stove, double bed, TV and CD player, toilet and shower, and banana bread baking in their FlavourWave oven. Of course, all of this was powered by a noisy generator.  They even had their cat with them – a gorgeous tortoiseshell kitty that lazed about in the hot sun.

 

 

It was a scorcher of a day but we were still curious to explore the area.  The birdlife that surrounded the jetty and ferry was dynamic, with cormorants and silver gulls sunning and preening themselves and the giant pelicans soaring above or skimming the water of Lake Alexandrina in search of a tasty morsel.

 

There were a few boats moored by the ferry – fishing boats that would leave first thing in the morning and return in the afternoon.  Apparently, all they would catch is carp. The ferry is a 24hr service that connects the northern and southern ends of Poltalloch Road.  We hitched a ride to the other side to check out the lighthouse on the hill.

 

 

The Point Malcolm Lighthouse is the smallest lighthouse and only inland lighthouse in Australia.  It was operational between 1878 and 1931 to mark the narrow passage between Lake Alexandrina and Lake Albert, the passage that the ferry crosses.  The area was used frequently in the 1800s by fishing boats, sailing vessels and paddle steamers from the Murray River.  In 1931, the lighthouse was replaced with a light on a pole to guide commercial and recreational traffic on the lakes.

 

On the way back to camp, we purchased a huge bag of firewood from the ferry operator for only $5.   We stayed in Narrung for two days, enjoying the lack of reception and the quiet, whist loathing the flies.  One of the highlights of our lazy days was a visit from a shingleback lizard that decided that the best way to get from A to B was through our camp.

 

 

The nearest town is the aboriginal community of Raukkan.  It was established in 1982 (before then, the area was called Port McLeay) and is administered by the Ngarrindjeri people, has a population of about 120 people and is the birthplace of David Unaipon, the guy who is on the $50 note.  He was a preacher, inventor and was the first Aboriginal man to publish in English, writing for newspapers and magazines like the Sydney Daily Telegraph.