Experience : Kakadu National Park – Part 2

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Continued from Experience : Kakadu National Park – Part 1

 

DAY 4

Bukbukluk Lookout

We got up early to check out Bukbukluk Lookout at sunrise.  It was a nice little lookout, and we later found out that bukbuk means pheasant coucal – a bird that we saw many times over the previous days.

 

Kakadu National Park

 

Yurmikmik

Yurmikmik is within the Jawoyn people’s country and there are a few walking trails available.  We tried to do as much as we could but we were really tired from the day before.  We aimed to complete three walks – Motor Car Falls, Boulder Creek and the Lookout, which provided amazing 360° views of the surrounding sandstone cliffs.

 

Kakadu National Park

 

The 3.8km walk to Motor Car Falls started with a bouncy rope bridge that allowed only one person at a time.  It was the most entertaining part of the journey – the rest of the way was hot, rocky and dry.  Luckily, bush passionfruit was available along the way to fuel the long hike through grass and woodland.

 

Kakadu National Park

 

Once we arrived at Motor Car Falls, we had refreshing dip in the pool before looking around.  We found some huge Golden Orb Spiders in massive webs that the butterflies skilfully dodged, and there were turtles and freshwater yabbies in the water.

 

 

On the way back, we went to Boulder Creek and it proved to be the best way to end the day.  We climbed the cascading falls and cooled off in the pretty pools.  We only went as far as the first tier, but two girls we met along the way went up even further.

 

Kakadu National Park

 

Kambolgie

Because we were so exhausted from the last two days, we made our way to camp early.  When we arrived, there was smoke everywhere and fires surrounding the camp site.  As it turned out, the rangers were patch burning the area to clear the dry fodder, increase biodiversity of plants and create a firebreak to protect the campers from unexpected wildfires.  It was great to meet the rangers and watch the yellow grass burn and crackle as the flames grew.  We noticed hundreds of grasshoppers jumping around, doing their best to get away from the flames and asked the rangers about how the lizards and other critters deal with the controlled burning.  They advised us that they factor that into the path of the fire and ensure pockets of unburnt land for animals to flee to.  Before they left, the rangers also hosed down the toilets so we had clean utilities for our stay – WIN!

 

 

Kambolgie was the best camp spot, in our opinion.  There was heaps of space, drop toilets, picnic benches and fire places and while it only costs $5 per person per nights, they were not accepting payment.  Recycling bins were available at the entrance and there were NO MOSQUITOES after the sun went down.  This could have been from the back burning but it was lovely to sit by the fire and enjoy a nice glass of wine.

 

DAY 5

Ikoymarrwa

While this location isn’t marked on the map, we were given the heads up at the information centre a few days earlier.  We were unsure where the turn off was because it’s also unsigned but once we found the place, it’s just a short walk to waterfalls and swimming hole.  As you explore further down the creek, you’ll find plenty of St Andrews Cross spiders waiting for a meal.

 

Miners Lookout and Park While we were in town, we also checked out the Miners Lookout and Miners Park, and learnt about

 

Picnic facilities and a fireplace are also available – with the possibility of camping too.

 

 

We knew we had completed our Kakadu experience when we got to the Mary River Roadhouse.  Overall, we really enjoyed our time in Kakadu and our only regret is that we didn’t go in June, when all of the attractions are open.  While we only spent five days in Kakadu, but it’s so big that you could easily spend two weeks exploring the park.

 

Miners Lookout and Park While we were in town, we also checked out the Miners Lookout and Miners Park, and learnt about

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